FRUA Scholarship Program – 2018

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TWO SCHOLARSHIPS…

FOR A GRADUATING SENIOR

AND A CONTINUING COLLEGE STUDENT

The National Board of Directors of Families for Russian and Ukrainian Adoption, Including Neighboring Countries (FRUA), is pleased to announce that this year we plan to continue our scholarship program for the 2018-2019 academic year for our members. The scholarship program is funded by tax-deductible donations to FRUA.

Two scholarships will be offered: one for a graduating high school senior, one for a continuing post secondary student.

To Download Scholarship Application, 

To obtain the applications you must be an active member of FRUA.  

  • Go into the Member Center at https://frua.memberclicks.net/login
  • Log in to verify that your family has an active membership
  • Click on the Member Resources tab
  • Click on the Scholarships sub-tab
  • That will give you two links, one for high school seniors, one for continuing college students.
  • If your have forgotten your user name or password follow the directions on the login page.
  • If you need further help please contact education@frua.org

APPLICATION DEADLINE: MARCH 4, 2018.

Electronic submissions should be made to info@frua.org

Applications will only be processed from students whose families are members in good standing of Families for Russian & Ukrainian Adoption, Including Neighboring countries. Students who have previously submitted applications and not won are encouraged to apply again for a continuing post secondary scholarship.

Awards will be announced by the end of May, 2018 and scholarships will be awarded by November, 2018.

This is the eighth year that FRUA has offered student scholarships. We are able to offer scholarships each year based on the availability of two critical resources; financial donations to fund the scholarship program, and the volunteer time of those who serve on the scholarship committee.

The quality of the applicants for FRUA scholarships each year has been amazing. It demonstrates to the world what our children can accomplish and how far they can go with the support of their families and the hope, help and community of FRUA behind their efforts. FRUA salutes all FRUA families for the tremendous effort you put into parenting.

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