In Armenia, ‘What Do You Want to Be?’ Is Asked in Infancy – NYTimes.com

Source: www.nytimes.com

By Bryant Rousseau

Image1Children in Armenia start thinking about their careers at a very young age — around six months or so.

When an infant’s first tooth arrives, typically in four to seven months, a celebration takes place known variously as the “agra hadig” or “atam hatik.”

As part of the ritual, objects symbolizing different professions are arrayed in front of a child: a microphone for an entertainer, a stethoscope for a doctor, scissors for a tailor or money for a banker. Whichever object the baby chooses first is thought to be a sign of where the child’s professional aptitude lies.

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Blaming The Parents Of Children With Special Needs

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com

By Shawna Wingert, Contributor

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Since the day my first baby was born, I have felt responsible for my children’s differences.

Not responsible in the “I’m the momma so I need to help my child” kinda way (although I certainly feel that too).

Responsible in the “Why do you let him sleep with you instead of in the crib, eat the ice cream instead of the meat, allow him to make the mess, help him in the bathroom when he is almost ten” kinda way.

I have been blamed, at one point or another, for every single one of my boys’ differences. Moreover, as we have received diagnosis after diagnosis, I find the blame comes even more frequently now ― not less.

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Adorable Down Syndrome Baby Gets A Modeling Job With OshKosh B’gosh

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Click here to watch the video.

After a modeling agency snubbed this adorable baby’s photos because he has Down syndrome, people around the world reacted.

And now he’s got a job with OshKosh B’gosh!

Georgia’s Emerging, Avant-Garde Designers to Know!

Source: nytimes.com

By Nancy Hass

tiblisi-designers-slide-JVPY-master768 Strictly speaking, Nata Janberidze and Keti Toloraia began their creative collaboration in a vacuum. When they started designing objects and interiors a ­decade ago, fresh out of art school, their hometown Tbilisi, the capital of Georgia, a small country on the Black Sea that spent much of the 20th century as part of the Soviet Union, had no creative community for two young designers to gain inspiration from, or any local market for the one-of-a-kind groundbreaking pieces they designed under the distinctly Western, purposefully plain name Rooms.

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Why Now Is The Time To Drink Wines From Georgia (the Country)

Source: http://www.grubstreet.com

By Chris Crowley

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The main thing you notice about Mariam Losebidze’s 2014 Tavkveri is that it tastes like it’s infused with smoked fat. This is wine, albeit obscure wine, and wine tends not to taste like bacon. But Losebidze is one of only a handful of female winemakers from the country of Georgia — the former Soviet republic sandwiched between Russia and Armenia’s northern border — and her wines are unapologetically bold. They were also, until recently, largely only available in her home country. But now some of America’s most progressive importers and sommeliers have turned their attention to Georgia, which produces wines that are unlike anything else.

Just as you might expect, plenty of Georgian wine is a far cry from grand cru Burgundies or the Pinot Noirs of California. For Western palates, much of it can seem, frankly, weird. In a lot of ways, the growing appreciation for Georgian wine is an extension of the continuing demand for so-called natural wines, the catchall term that refers to wines made with minimal processing, resulting in unpredictable, rustic wines where the makers — as opposed to the grape or region — are often the focus.

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The Amygdala and Stopping Fight or Flight at the Source by Donald Craig Peterson

Source: www.adoptingfaithafathersunconditionallove.org

amygdala What on earth is the amygdala? Most have no idea. Even less can say it.

Let’s start with the pronunciation. Amygdala contains four syllables with the accent on the second one. Remember to say “ah” three times.

ah-MIG-dah-lah

Now that I’ve made you look silly, let’s move onto the important message. The amygdala is a tiny yet powerful part of the brain – actually another bunch of neurons. Yet it plays a huge role in our emotions, particularly those related to survival.

That’s right – SURVIVAL.

Buried under the massive cortex, the amygdala is part of the lesser known limbic system which supports motivation, learning and memory. The amygdala – along with the hippocampus – determines which memories are accumulated and where those memories are stored in the brain.

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One of The Biggest Names in Fashion Just Changed the Game for Kids With Disabilities

13de6b6b2d42b7180f7d5db678c06ec4 Fashion designer Tommy Hilfiger debuted the first-ever clothing line for children with disabilities on Tuesday.

The American fashion designer partnered with Runway of Dreams, "a non profit organization that works with fashion industry to create clothing for the disabled community." to bring an adaptive fashion line to consumers, the Hollywood Reporter reports.

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Adopted boys finally unite with their parents after painful 3-year wait

Source: www.today.com

By Alexandra Zaslow

adopted-family-united-hug_2a72fa315a45f2a9134b1aaa8acf17f5.today-inline-large After a three-year wait, Jennifer and James Grover’s two sons are finally home.

The Utah family’s lengthy journey began in 2012 when they first began the process of adopting Joseph, 14, and Bronson, 7, from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

And it capped off with an emotional meeting at Salt Lake City airport earlier this month, when the boys raced into their awaiting parents’ arms.

"Until I was holding them, I didn’t believe it," Jennifer Grover said. "We’ve already been through the adoption process three times before, but this one sent us on an emotional roller coaster."

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She Inspired Those With Down Syndrome As Unstoppable

Source: www.washingtonpost.com

By Theresa Vargas

pioneer_2016030902731457556429 Laura Lee took pride in her résumé. On it, separated by bold lettering and bullet points, she listed one achievement after another: She graduated from George Mason University. She worked at the World Bank. She volunteered at a food bank. She spoke at national conventions.

Not mentioned: She was born with Down syndrome.

For the 400,000 Americans like her who are often characterized by their limitations, Lee changed what they and their families viewed as possible. She was the first person with Down syndrome many people saw participate on panels. Or go to college. Or work in a professional setting. At the World Bank, where she was an office assistant earning $12.24 an hour, her name was on her office door. If the cruelest part of Down syndrome comes from the walls it erects, the ultimate joy for many people in the intellectual-disabilities community came in watching Lee leap over those walls, time and again. In many ways, she seemed unstoppable — until she wasn’t.

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Nuns among 16 killed in Yemen as gunmen storm retirement home

Source: http://www.theguardian.com

Four gunmen entered home run by Mother Theresa charity claiming they wanted to visit their mothers – then they opened fire

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Gunmen in southern Yemen have stormed a retirement home run by a charity established by Mother Teresa, killing 16 people, including four Catholic nuns, according to officials and witnesses.

Four gunmen reportedly entered the the home housing about 80 elderly people in Aden on Friday, on the pretext that they wanted to visit their mothers at the facility.

The gunmen moved from room to room, handcuffing the victims before shooting them in the head. A nun who survived and was rescued by local residents said she hid inside a fridge in a storeroom after hearing a Yemeni guard shouting “run, run”.

Khaled Haidar said that he counted 16 bodies, including that of his brother, Radwan. All had been shot in the head and were handcuffed. He said one Yemeni cook and Yemeni guards were among those killed.

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