“Ruby Finds A Worry” by Tom Percival: A Read Aloud Story For Your Family!

A big thank you to our friends @guilfordnonprofitconsortium for sharing this perfect video from @kellinfoundation at just the right time when our kids could use a message like this the most, “Ruby Finds A Worry.”

Grab the kids and take a seat together, talk about how your own family is managing the changes and the inevitable worries all of us are experiencing, young and old alike.  We would love to hear your ideas, too!

Teen adoption from here or abroad, the need is great.

This Sweet PSA About Adoption Shows a Teen Slowly Realizing He’s Part of a Family.

Contact info@hopscotchadotions.org or ukraine@hopscotchadoptions.org

It’s no secret that when most people think of adoption, their minds immediately go to babies or young toddlers. But the hard truth is that there are children of all ages in foster care looking for their forever homes, and teens have far lower adoption rates than younger children do.

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Armenia is Open. Here’s What One Family Has to Share with You!

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Every Child Deserves…

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Meet the Spring Family: The Family that Adopted Six Children with Down Syndrome (And One with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome) by Special Books by Special Kids

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See video.

The Spring family adopted six children with Down syndrome and one with Fetal Alcohol syndrome. The seven are now learning to function together as a family as their parents’ guide each individual to their full potential.

#adoption #downsyndrome #serbia #adoptionislove #hopscotchadoptions

Webinar: Registration is Now Open for Perspectives on Transracial Adoption

Perspectives on Transracial Adoption

Perspectives on Transracial Adoption is an honest dialogue about some of the tough realities and complex issues that children adopted transracially may experience and how their parents can guide, support and prepare them for a society that is far from color blind.
Join us for a moderated panel of people who were transracially placed. They will reflect back to their childhood as well as comment on their current feelings about being transracially adopted.

We will post to the panelists YOUR questions such as:

When and how do I discuss race with my child?

What should I as a parent do to ensure connection with my child’s birth culture?

What did their adopted parents do that helped them through the journey and what do they wish their parents had done?

Register Now

This webcast is brought to you by ALP in cooperation with Our Children: An Education & Empowerment Series. Learn more about the Our Children Initiative here.

Keeping Your Marriage Solid When Adopting or Fostering by Creating A Family

Source: https://creatingafamily.org/

“One of the wisest pieces of advice I received as a new parent was the following: The greatest gift you can give your child is a healthy and happy relationship with your spouse. Four kids later all I can add is a loud “AMEN”!” by Creating A Family. #SaveAdoptions

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It is so easy in the thralls of new parenthood to be completely obsessed with your new baby or child. It is also pretty common to be completely overwhelmed by the demands of new motherhood/fatherhood. This is the case regardless whether you adopt a newborn, a 6 year old, or foster a sibling group of 3. Parenthood can be all-consuming if we let it. I’m suggesting that you don’t let it consume your marriage.

Parenting is a Marathon, not a Sprint!

You’re going to be parents for a LONG time. Even when your kids are grown and have flown the nest, you will still be parenting. It’s easy to forget this at the beginning. When asked in the Creating a Family Facebook Support Group what they were doing to find time for their marriage, we heard the following:

  • Not Much. But we’re older parents and I guess we had time before to ourselves so we’re kind of ok with all family time. We go out maybe every 6 weeks or so. We’ve kind of turned more into best friends and partners in crime but we’re ok with that.
  • We are fostering and parenting and all our time and energy are going to the kids. I feel like we give each other only our leftovers. And lately neither of us have much left over. We know we need to do something about it, but just don’t have the energy or time to do it.
  • We don’t. DH and I are lacking. We try to have alone time in the car or at 2 am, but it’s hard.

For the record, alone time when you are passing in the hallway at 2:00 am does not count!

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Panel of Parents Adopting Older Kids: Surviving that 1st Year – Creating a Family

Source: https://creatingafamily.org/

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Adopting and fostering older kids is hard for both the child and the parent, especially the first year. A panel of moms who have adopted older kids share their tips for surviving the first year home. Host Dawn Davenport, Executive Director of Creating a Family, the national infertility & adoption education and support nonprofit, interviews Melissa Basham, mom to 4 boys adopted from foster care; Abigail Betancourt, mom to 2 kids adopted from foster care; Jan Egozi, mom to one child adopted internationally; and Shelley McMullen, mom to 1 child adopted internationally.

Listen to podcast.

There Are No Unwanted Children: Just Unfound Families

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Supporting Military Families in Adoption, by Laura Beauvais

By Laura Beauvais

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Military families have the potential to be outstanding adoptive families. They often have an incredible support network of friends. Military families tend to be flexible and adaptable and those are qualities that can help make great parents. The installments, where they often live, usually provide no-cost health care, including occupational, physical, and speech therapy, as well as counseling. Dental and vision care are usually provided with a co-pay. Even when military personnel move, the support systems are similar in the next location, so these families do not have to “relearn” what is available at the next location. If an adopted child has serious needs that cannot be met at an installation’s facilities, the military parent cannot be transferred to that installation, as outlined in the Exceptional Family Member Program.

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