Adoption Notice – Adoptions from Ghana after March 2, 2017

Ghana Flag 2012On January 1, 2017, the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-Operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Convention) entered into force for Ghana. After reviewing Ghana’s Amended Children’s Act of 2016, and confirming the establishment of Ghana’s Central Authority, the United States has determined that it will now be able to issue Hague Adoption Certificates for adoptions from Ghana. Consular officers will verify on a case-by-case basis that an intercountry adoption can proceed in accordance with the Convention, as well as with U.S. laws and U.S. obligations. 

The Department of State cautions U.S. prospective adoptive parents that there may be delays in the adoption process while Ghana works to implement its new adoption laws, regulations, and procedures. Prospective adoptive parents initiating an intercountry adoption on or after January 1, 2017, should work closely with their U.S. accredited adoption service provider (ASP) to ensure they complete all necessary steps under Ghana’s adoption process in accordance with Ghanaian and U.S. laws.  

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IMPORTANT: Adoption Notice-Update on Convention Entry into Force for Ghana

Dear family,

The Department of State has issued an adoption notice regarding adoptions from Ghana after January 1, 2017.  The short of the notice is as follows:

1. Though the country of Ghana has signed the Hague Convention treaty, the government has not yet passed the Children’s Bill of 2016, nor have they installed a Central Authority.  Both of these must be in place before adoptions can proceed after January 1, 2017

2. Families that file an I-800A or I-800 before the Children’s Bill of 2016 and the Central Authority has been installed, will be denied. 

3. Families that have already filed a I-600A or I-600 do not yet have a clear path to be Grandfathered at this time.  The Department of State is seeking clarification from the Ghanaian government if they will permit I-600A and I-600 petitions filed prior to January 1, 2017 to proceed under the non-Hague process.

We will continue to monitor the implementation of the Children’s Bill of 2016 and installation of the Central Authority.  Until then, all cases are in a holding pattern as of today, per the Department of State’s notice to Adoption Service Providers and families.   

With encouragement,
Your Hopscotch Team   

Adoption Notice: Adoption Notice: Adoptions from Ghana after January 1, 2017

January 3, 2016

ghana-flagOn January 1, 2017 the Hague Convention on Protection of Children and Co-Operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption (Convention) will enter into force for Ghana.  However, please be advised that the Department of State has determined that it will not be able to issue Hague Adoption Certificates for adoptions from Ghana that are initiated on or after January 1, 2017 under the Convention because Ghana’s implementing legislation, the Children’s Bill of 2016, has not yet been signed into law, and a Central Authority has not been established.  As a result, consular officers will be unable to issue Hague Adoption Certificates.  Without this certification, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) cannot approve Form I-800 Petitions to Classify Convention Adoptees as an Immediate Relative.

Once the Children’s Bill is signed into law, and the Central Authority is established, the United States will be able to partner with Ghana as a Convention country.  However, until that time, families interested in adopting from Ghana should not file the Form I-800, Petition to Classify Convention Adoptee as an Immediate Relative for a child from GhanaIf a Form I-800 petition is filed on behalf of a child from Ghana, USCIS will have to reject the petition.  Once the Children’s Bill is signed into law, and the Central Authority is established, families will be able to file Form I-800 petitions.  The Department of State will notify USCIS and the public immediately once the bill is signed into law, and the Department is able to confirm that it will be able to issue Hague Adoption Certificates for  adoptions from Ghana.

In the meantime, we are confirming with Ghanaian officials whether Ghana will permit cases in which a U.S. citizen filed a Form I-600A, Application for Advance Processing of Orphan Petition, or a Form I-600, Petition to Classify Orphan as an immediate relative, prior to January 1 to continue under the non-Hague adoption process.  Once we are able to confirm this information, we will post an updated notice on adoption.state.gov.  As of January 1, 2017, families initiating an adoption in Ghana should not file, and USCIS will not accept, a Form I-600A or Form I-600 for a child from Ghana.  Please contact adoption@state.gov with the details of the case if this situation applies to you. 

We are in the process of updating our Country Information Sheet for Ghana.  Please continue to monitor adoption.state.gov for updated information as it becomes available.  If you have any questions about this notice, please contact the Office of Children’s Issues at adoption@state.gov.  You may also reach us at 1-888-407-4747 within the United States, or 202-501-4444 from outside the United States.  

Adoption Alert: Ghana accedes to the 1993 Hague Convention on Intercountry Adoption – September 29, 2016

Finally!!!  Let’s hope for a smooth transition.  More and more children are waiting for families as the days go by.    

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On September 16, 2016 Ghana deposited its instrument of accession to the Convention on the Protection of Children and Co-operation in Respect of Intercountry Adoption Convention (Hague Adoption Convention) with the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of the Netherlands.  The Convention will enter into force for Ghana on January 1, 2016.  We will post additional information as soon as it is available.

From niece to cherished daughter. Kinship adoption works.

Hopscotch Adoptions, Inc is experienced in guiding and supporting families in crisis, when the need for a kinship adoption or kafala occurs.  If your family needs assistance in bringing an orphaned child relative to the US, as a permanent member of your family, Hopscotch would like to help you.

Contact us: info@hopscotchadoptions.org

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Hopscotch Can Help. Kinship Adoption and Kafala.

Hopscotch Adoptions, Inc is experienced in guiding and supporting families in crisis, when the need for a kinship adoption or kafala occurs.  If your family needs assistance in bringing an orphaned child relative to the US, as a permanent member of your family, Hopscotch would like to help you.

Contact us: info@hopscotchadoptions.org

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Ghana’s Big Green Heart!

Click here to see video.

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Preparing Jollof rice, the Ghanaian method

Published on May 7, 2013 by AdomHomeCooking

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Click here to see video.

Ingredients in this recipe for 4 Adults:

  • 4 cups of rice
  • 8 pieces of Chicken thighs and drumsticks
  • 3 large onions
  • Pepper, garlic, ginger (amount optional)
  • Chicken seasoning/ seasoning of choice
  • 2 cups mixed veggies
  • 1 can Tomato Plumps &Tomato puree
  • Salt to taste
  • Maggie cube( optional)

Procedure

1.

  • Prepare chicken, wash and pat dry.
  • Sprinkle chicken with salt to season
  • Blend onion, ginger, garlic and pepper.
  • Add to the chicken, add chicken season if you want.
  • Steam the chicken for about 8-10 min.

2.

  • Blend plump tomatoes, with some onion and pepper depending on how spicy you want your Jollof.
  • Slice the remaining onions into medium sizes.

3.

  • Start making the stew or gravy by frying the sliced onions in about 3 table spoons of veggie oil and allow to cook for about 2 mins
  • Add 4 tablespoons of tomato puree and keep stirring for about 8 min till it is reduced.
  • Add the blended tomato mixture and allow to cook and reduce for about 10 more minutes, stirring intermittently.

4.

  • When the steamed chicken is ready, strain and reserve the stock, allow stock to cool.
  • Deep fry chicken for the golden brown crusty finish.
  • Put the fried chicken aside.

5.

  • Add the stock to the stew and allow to cook for about 5 minutes
  • Add your chicken to the stew( optional as chicken can be served separately when the entire meal is done).
  • Add the mixed veggies and cook for a couple of mins.( scoop some stew out if preferred to be served with Jollof later).
  • Add the rice and reduce the heat to very low. Cover the rice with kitchen foil and allow the food the steam through.
  • Check and keep stirring intermittently till rice is cooked through, about 20 min.

6.

  • Scoop some of the rice in a small bowl and press to form a nice mound, turn into your serving plate. Add your chicken.
  • Can be served with salad ,gravy, coleslaw etc.

Enjoy your meal.

News from Ghana: Our hearts are heavy with your loss and grief.

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News from Ghana: Massive Flood and Fire Leave Ghanaians in Shock.  Our hearts are heavy with your loss and grief.

Read more.

News from Ghana: Kybele Sponsored Three Nurse Managers of Ridge Regional Hospital, Ghana

Article by Yemi Olufolabi, MD

1 
Using simulation to learn about acute maternal care.

In October, Kybele had the opportunity to sponsor three NICU nurses/nurse managers from Ridge Regional Hospital in Accra, Ghana.  Partially funded through a multi-year grant from the PATH organization, nurses Rebecca Agyare Asante, Vivian Koffie, and Fauziya Rabiu were able to spend a two-week observership at Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C., and they definitely packed a lot into their visit. The women were able to visit the Duke Neonatal Unit and all related wards, the Duke simulation center, the education center, and the maternity operating room. They attended clinical meetings, a neonatal resuscitation training session,  in-service training for new staff nurses, and safety rounds.  They also visited with Dr. Lisa Washburn from Wake Forest Medical Center in Winston-Salem, where they discussed current protocols and improvement potential at Ridge Hospital. In addition, they visited the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill maternity center, which is operated by midwives.  

2 
Neonatal resuscitation simulation.

During all of this observation, the Ridge nurses had extensive exposure to a system that prevented and treated infection in babies.  Given that new breathing methods (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure – CPAP) were recently introduced at Ridge Hospital, a special session with nurses and respiratory therapists on the CPAP machine proved highly educational. Other important observations involved infant feeding techniques, customer care best practices, and the environmental factors that nurture optimal brain development.  The Ridge nurses were impressed by the dedication of the Duke nurses and their intensity of focus while caring for babies. The meticulous and attentive approach in the management of each baby really stood out for them.

3 
Finally arriving at Raleigh Airport and meeting Dr Olufolabi.

The Ridge nurses returned home excited and reassured that they could further raise standards of care at Ridge Hospital. They resolved to make changes that would improve outcomes.  As a result of their visit, they planned to incorporate changes by sharing their experiences with their colleagues and ensuring infection prevention became a priority, because it is one of the major causes of maternal and infant mortality. The nurses promised to improve customer care practices by engaging parents and improving communication among staff through the use of technology and by refining old protocols or developing new ones.

While their visit was jam-packed with educational experiences, the nurses also had the opportunity for some fun by attending a local festival, shopping, and visiting with local nurses and Kybele team members.  They said they were grateful to those who made their stay such a memorable experience, especially the Duke NICU nurses, Christine Phillips, Dr. Ron Goldberg, Kybele and Yemi and Lola Olufolabi, who hosted them in their home.

See MORE PHOTOS of the Ridge nurses’ trip to North Carolina.

Kybele, Inc in action in Ghana

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See Video.

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