KEEP THE PROMISE 2017!

The Office of Children’s Issues at the U.S. Department of State has declared May 15th Post-Adoption Report Day. It’s an opportunity to highlight the importance that parents who have adopted through intercountry adoption keep their promises and submit post-adoption reports as they committed to during the adoption process.

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Here are 3 simple reasons NCFA believes Post-Adoption Reporting matters!

  1. You promised!
    As a part of the adoption process, you were entrusted with the care of your child and promised to share about their future experiences. While it is easy to forget about extra paperwork in the important work of caring for your children, we think keeping your promise to report back on the wellbeing of your child is critically important.
  2. It’s a great opportunity for reflection.
    Post-adoption reports are a good time to do some reflection and assessment. Consider your reporting dates an opportunity, not an obligation.  You can review and celebrate progress and milestones. Take a moment to consider what types of support might help your child (and you!) to grow and thrive. And consider what your goals are for your child and your family between now and the next reporting date. It’s also a terrific time to touch base with your adoption agency or other adoption professionals if you need any support. For some countries, you’re required to connect with your agency at this time anyway. It’s a natural and convenient time to touch base about any questions, concerns, or supports your family might find valuable.
  3. You’re helping to support future adoptions.
    Post-adoption reports are one of the ways countries assess whether children are healthy, safe, and loved as a result of intercountry adoption. This information can be critical to deciding whether future children will have the option to join families through intercountry adoption or might otherwise languish in institutions or other impermanent situations.

So, what exactly is a post-adoption report? While the number and timing of reports required varies, generally the report’s goal is to discuss the child’s development and adjustment to a new family, home, and country. It’s important to pay special attention to the specific requirements in the country a child is adopted from. The type of information, how it should be assessed (through an agency or by parents themselves), and how it should be submitted can vary widely from country to country. Below, we’ve listed some basic information on several countries reporting requirements. If you have specific questions about what your reporting requirements are, we encourage you to reach out to your adoption service provider to learn more. Department of State also provides country specific information and can be contacted if you need more information.

Post-Adoption Report Requirements

We aren’t listing in detail all the country requirements, but wanted to give examples of some common countries of origin and their general guidelines, we’ve also linked through to more specific information at Department of State for each country. Of course, the best way to get information on what is required for your adoption is always to contact your adoption service provider and confirm what was required by the country at the time of your adoption and any other requirements the agency might have that you agreed to during the adoption process.

Bulgaria: 4 reports required. One every six months after adoption for first two years.

China: 6 reports required. Six months after adoption and at 1,2,3,4, and 5 years after adoption. First 3 reports must be prepared by the social workers who prepared the homestudy. Families may write last three reports themselves.

Colombia: 4 reports—signed by social worker—at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months from the date of the final court decree which is signed while the family is in Colombia.

Ethiopia: Post-adoption reports are required at 3, 6, and 12 months post-adoption. After the first year, reports must be filed yearly until child turns 18.

Haiti: 7 post-adoption reports are typically required. The first 4 must be completed with the adoption service provider at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after adoption. The last 3 reports at moths 36, 48, and 60 may be submitted directly to IBESR by adoptive parents.

India: Post-adoption reports are required quarterly in the first year after adoption, and twice a year during the 2nd year. They may be submitted online by the adoption service provider.

Kazakhstan: Post-adoption reports are required every six months for the first 3 years, and once a year until the child is 18. Reports are to be submitted to Kazakhstani diplomatic mission in the country of the child’s residence.

Philippines: During the first 6 months of custody the adoption service provider must conduct bi-monthly reports. After this period, adoptive parents should file a petition for adoption in U.S. court.

Russia: Russia requires children to be registered with the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs before they leave Russia or with the Russian Embassy or Consulate upon arrive in the U.S. 4 post-adoption reports are required. The reports should be completed: (1) 5 months after adoption court order and submitted no later than the end of the 7th month, (2) 11 months after adoption court order and no later than then end of the 13th month, (3) 23 months after adoption court order and submitted no later than the end of the 25th month, and (4) 35 months after adoption court order and no later than then end of the 37th month.

Ukraine: Post-adoption reports are required annually for the first 3 years, and once every 3 years thereafter until the child is 18.


Somewhere A Child is Waiting for You!

Child.

From niece to cherished daughter. Kinship adoption works.

Hopscotch Adoptions, Inc is experienced in guiding and supporting families in crisis, when the need for a kinship adoption or kafala occurs.  If your family needs assistance in bringing an orphaned child relative to the US, as a permanent member of your family, Hopscotch would like to help you.

Contact us: info@hopscotchadoptions.org

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Hopscotch Can Help. Kinship Adoption and Kafala.

Hopscotch Adoptions, Inc is experienced in guiding and supporting families in crisis, when the need for a kinship adoption or kafala occurs.  If your family needs assistance in bringing an orphaned child relative to the US, as a permanent member of your family, Hopscotch would like to help you.

Contact us: info@hopscotchadoptions.org

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News from Morocco: Hopscotch Urgently Seeks Muslim Families for Morocco Program

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Moroccan News Story Interviews with Waiting Children!

If you loved the Moroccan News Story about the Circular and Want More, We Have it!  Check out this longer version that include interviews with sweet boys waiting for forever families.  Maybe they are waiting for your family.  info@hopscotchadoptions.org

See Video.

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Moroccan Orphans Without Hope Grow In Numbers By The Day: Muslim Families Desperately Needed!

May 27, 2015

Special correspondent Kira Kay reports as part of a partnership with the Bureau for International Reporting

Orphanages in Morocco face a unique challenge in trying to find permanent homes for children in their care. A recent law has made it nearly impossible for many would-be parents, especially under the Islamist government. 

Read more.

Hopscotch Adoptions, is honored to serve Morocco’s children and Muslim families, since 2010.  Hopscotch is dedicated to serving All children, All families and All Faiths. 

News from Morocco: It’s A Girl!!! Kafala Granted Today!

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Watchtower of Morocco on Vimeo

See video.

Walking through the streets of Marrakech, Essaouira, Fes el Bali and Casablanca.. taking in the sights and sounds of this beautiful place. I just wish my camera had shown the true beauty of Morocco.

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UN Report Expresses Concern Over Protection of Vulnerable Children in Morocco

It is great to see that the UN is urging Morocco to support unwed mothers and to consider adoption as a viable option, along with kinship and foster/kefala/guardianship.  The UN notes that Moroccan children are vulnerable to be taken into domestic servitude, without stronger measures in place.  

Source: http://www.moroccoworldnews.com/2014/09/140434/un-report-expresses-concern-over-protection-of-vulnerable-children-in-morocco/

By Colin Kilkelly

timthumb.php In particular, the committee is concerned that article 490 of the Moroccan Criminal Code punishes sexual relations outside marriage, resulting in dozens of babies being abandoned every day in the country.

The committee also expressed deep concern at the stigmatization and social rejection of single mothers in Morocco, of whom one third are adolescents. It also expressed concern over the serious consequences of this social rejection for their children, many of whom do not have identification documents or birth certificates, resulting in them having no legal existence.

The Committee’s report urged the Moroccan government to repeal article 490 and to provide unmarried mothers with support to enable them to take care of their children. It also called on the government to protect the rights of pregnant teenagers, adolescent mothers, and their children.

Read more.

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