2017 FRUA Young Adult Membership – Webinars!

Join as a FRUA Young Adult by Oct. 22 to access a Webinar created especially for you!

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October marks the first of many FRUA YA special membership benefits – "Adoption: the Identity Project", a webinar made by and for young adults, is produced by Adoption Learning Partners and made available by a partnership between FRUA and ALP.

FRUA’s new young adult membership, is specifically targeted to the needs and interests of young adults adopted from the 32 countries of the former Soviet bloc which FRUA INC serves.

Join by October 22, and receive free access to the Webinar. Then on November 5, join our FRUA Young adult leaders, Paul Jones and Stephan Petryczka, in the first FRUA YA national conference call. They want your input to plan future YA events, and will discuss upcoming orphan support efforts, which will become a service project directed by our young adults.

Don’t wait! If you are adopted and age 21 or older, join now! Or if you have an adopted young adult age 21 or older — tell them to join now!

Annual membership is just $10 – but the hope help and community of a FRUA YA membership will be priceless. To learn more about the benefits of the FRUA YA membership, follow this link:  Young Adult Membership

Or, to go directly to the YA Membership Application Form, click YA Application.

Looking forward to a growing FRUA YA community!

The FRUA National Board of Directors

Families for Russian and Ukrainian Adoption,
Including Neighboring Countries
Hope, Help and Community for Adoptive Families

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Ukraine: Missing Post Adoption Report Notice

ukraine-flagThis Adoption Notice is a reminder to adoption service providers and adoptive parents of Ukraine’s post-adoption reporting requirements. In accordance with the Ukrainian Family Code, all parents who adopt children from Ukraine must provide post-adoption reports every year for the first three years after the adoption is finalized, and then once every three years until the child turns 18. This reporting must include information on the general welfare, education, upbringing, and health of the child. For more information about the contents of the reports, please visit the Ministry for Foreign Affair’s web page. You may also access the report from this link.

Continue reading.

Attention to All 2017 Summer Host Families for Ukraine – Big News!

Ukraine App Fee Waived 08-04-2017Dear Summer 2017 Host Families:

Hopscotch Adoptions will be waiving our $250 application fee for any summer 2017 host families!!  If you would like to complete your adoption through Hopscotch, please indicate you are a Summer 2017 host family on the application and we’ll waive the application fee!

Want learn more about adopting from Ukraine?

Monday, Aug 7, 2017    7:00 PM – 8:00 PM EDT
Please join our meeting from your computer, tablet or smartphone.
https://global.gotomeeting.com/join/634854341
You can also dial in using your phone.
United States: +1 (224) 501-3412

Access Code: 634-854-341

**Please be sure to keep your phones/computer speakers on “mute” during the call so that everyone can hear clearly.

We hope that you can join us!  If you are unable to attend the webinar and would like to contact me directly, or request an information packet, please reach out to me at (770) 309-4239 or ukraine@hopscotchadoptions.org

PS: Pease note Hopscotch conducts home study reports for families located in North Carolina and New York. If you reside in Georgia or Tennessee, we can refer you to our preferred agency partners!

KEEP THE PROMISE 2017!

The Office of Children’s Issues at the U.S. Department of State has declared May 15th Post-Adoption Report Day. It’s an opportunity to highlight the importance that parents who have adopted through intercountry adoption keep their promises and submit post-adoption reports as they committed to during the adoption process.

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Here are 3 simple reasons NCFA believes Post-Adoption Reporting matters!

  1. You promised!
    As a part of the adoption process, you were entrusted with the care of your child and promised to share about their future experiences. While it is easy to forget about extra paperwork in the important work of caring for your children, we think keeping your promise to report back on the wellbeing of your child is critically important.
  2. It’s a great opportunity for reflection.
    Post-adoption reports are a good time to do some reflection and assessment. Consider your reporting dates an opportunity, not an obligation.  You can review and celebrate progress and milestones. Take a moment to consider what types of support might help your child (and you!) to grow and thrive. And consider what your goals are for your child and your family between now and the next reporting date. It’s also a terrific time to touch base with your adoption agency or other adoption professionals if you need any support. For some countries, you’re required to connect with your agency at this time anyway. It’s a natural and convenient time to touch base about any questions, concerns, or supports your family might find valuable.
  3. You’re helping to support future adoptions.
    Post-adoption reports are one of the ways countries assess whether children are healthy, safe, and loved as a result of intercountry adoption. This information can be critical to deciding whether future children will have the option to join families through intercountry adoption or might otherwise languish in institutions or other impermanent situations.

So, what exactly is a post-adoption report? While the number and timing of reports required varies, generally the report’s goal is to discuss the child’s development and adjustment to a new family, home, and country. It’s important to pay special attention to the specific requirements in the country a child is adopted from. The type of information, how it should be assessed (through an agency or by parents themselves), and how it should be submitted can vary widely from country to country. Below, we’ve listed some basic information on several countries reporting requirements. If you have specific questions about what your reporting requirements are, we encourage you to reach out to your adoption service provider to learn more. Department of State also provides country specific information and can be contacted if you need more information.

Post-Adoption Report Requirements

We aren’t listing in detail all the country requirements, but wanted to give examples of some common countries of origin and their general guidelines, we’ve also linked through to more specific information at Department of State for each country. Of course, the best way to get information on what is required for your adoption is always to contact your adoption service provider and confirm what was required by the country at the time of your adoption and any other requirements the agency might have that you agreed to during the adoption process.

Bulgaria: 4 reports required. One every six months after adoption for first two years.

China: 6 reports required. Six months after adoption and at 1,2,3,4, and 5 years after adoption. First 3 reports must be prepared by the social workers who prepared the homestudy. Families may write last three reports themselves.

Colombia: 4 reports—signed by social worker—at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months from the date of the final court decree which is signed while the family is in Colombia.

Ethiopia: Post-adoption reports are required at 3, 6, and 12 months post-adoption. After the first year, reports must be filed yearly until child turns 18.

Haiti: 7 post-adoption reports are typically required. The first 4 must be completed with the adoption service provider at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after adoption. The last 3 reports at moths 36, 48, and 60 may be submitted directly to IBESR by adoptive parents.

India: Post-adoption reports are required quarterly in the first year after adoption, and twice a year during the 2nd year. They may be submitted online by the adoption service provider.

Kazakhstan: Post-adoption reports are required every six months for the first 3 years, and once a year until the child is 18. Reports are to be submitted to Kazakhstani diplomatic mission in the country of the child’s residence.

Philippines: During the first 6 months of custody the adoption service provider must conduct bi-monthly reports. After this period, adoptive parents should file a petition for adoption in U.S. court.

Russia: Russia requires children to be registered with the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs before they leave Russia or with the Russian Embassy or Consulate upon arrive in the U.S. 4 post-adoption reports are required. The reports should be completed: (1) 5 months after adoption court order and submitted no later than the end of the 7th month, (2) 11 months after adoption court order and no later than then end of the 13th month, (3) 23 months after adoption court order and submitted no later than the end of the 25th month, and (4) 35 months after adoption court order and no later than then end of the 37th month.

Ukraine: Post-adoption reports are required annually for the first 3 years, and once every 3 years thereafter until the child is 18.


Somewhere A Child is Waiting for You!

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News from Ukraine: Celebrating Forever Families and Our Newest US Citizen!

Hopscotch is celebrating this forever family welcoming their beautiful daughter home and her US citizenship day!

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Merry Christmas from Ukraine!

See video: Ukrainian Christmas Carol

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News from Ukraine: Hopscotch welcomes home our families!

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