Your Opportunity To Impact Adoptive Family Services – Please Take This Survey.

survey

Adoption Support Alliance is a nonprofit organization in Charlotte, North Carolina that was founded to support adoptive families.  They are conducting a survey of adoptive parents to learn more about how They can best meet families’ needs.  Please take ten minutes (or less) to share your thoughts with them. 

Adoption Support Alliance greatly appreciates your time and insights: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/T7HLNYV (Please share and re-tweet this survey)

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Pediatric Information Sheet for Pediatric Health Providers and Parents

6bdecbe8d56742f746d06bc8faa794fbDear Families and Educators,

The national Quality Improvement Center for Adoption and Guardianship Support and Preservation (QIC-AG) has developed a fact sheet about adoption tailored for pediatric health care providers. This fact sheet is designed to raise awareness about the unique needs of children who have been adopted, and to provide concrete tips on how these professionals can effectively work with these children.

This fact sheet can also be used by adoptive parents as tools for engaging their child’s health care providers in understanding the unique needs of their child.

Download Ask About Adoption – Pediatric Information Fact Sheet (PDF)

For more information contact:

Selena Childs
Clinical Associate Professor
UNC-CH School of Social Work
sbchilds@email.unc.edu
919-843-8144

Education Adoption Information Sheet for Teachers and Parents

1af3b7297c9a9204dbfd667b3def62daDear Families and Educators,

The national Quality Improvement Center for Adoption and Guardianship Support and Preservation (QIC-AG) has developed a fact sheet about adoption tailored for  teachers. These fact sheets are designed to raise awareness about the unique needs of children who have been adopted, and to provide concrete tips on how these professionals can effectively work with these children.

The fact sheets can also be used by adoptive parents as tools for engaging their child’s teachers in understanding the unique needs of their child.

Download Ask About Adoption – Education Fact Sheet (PDF)

For more information contact:

Selena Childs
Clinical Associate Professor
UNC-CH School of Social Work
sbchilds@email.unc.edu
919-843-8144

Multiple Citizenship in Adoption: An Introduction by NCFA’s legal fellow Kaylee Walsh

Map%20travel%20airplane%20world Those working in adoption often face questions about dual or multiple citizenship from prospective adoptive parents and adopted adolescents and adults, who want to know how the internationally adopted person will attain U.S. citizenship, if they will have two passports, or if being a citizen of their birth country will affect their U.S. citizenship. This article by NCFA legal fellow Kaylee Walsh provides an introduction to these and other issues regarding multi-citizenship in intercountry adoption.

Click here to download the PDF of Adoption Advocate No. 94 or click here to view the web version.

Parenting After Trauma: Understanding Your Child’s Needs by the American Academy of Pediatricians

This guide for families explains how trauma can impact a child and provides tips for making them feel safe in their new home. Pediatricians can reproduce and provide this handout to foster and adoptive parents.

Download Guide (PDF)

Asking for Support Post Adoption, Is a Sign of Strength, Not Weakness! Learn More Here.

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Download PDF.

Sexual Abuse Prior to Placement – Advice for Adoptive Parents

Source: http://www.adoptionlearningpartners.org/catalog/webinars/sexual-abuse-prior-to-placement.cfm

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Advice for Adoptive Parents

Live Webinar

Wednesday
October 15, 2014
7:00PM Central
Q&A: 8:00PM

It is a terribly sad reality that children adopted internationally or through foster care may have suffered sexual abuse.

Join Mary Jo Barrett as she provides insight to parents on:

  • Recognizing signs of past abuse in your child
  • How to respond if you suspect or know abuse happened
  • Protecting the child you are welcoming home and other children in the home
  • How to talk to your child about sexual rules or norms in their new home

Read more.

Helping Kids Transition from Foster Care to Adoption

Source: http://www.creatingafamily.org/radioshow/helping-kids-transition-from-foster-care-to-adoption.html?awt_l=IgdWw&awt_m=3kQbjTAr6r4QyZ0

Highlights from May 9, 2012 Creating a Family radio show

helpingkidstransitionFoster care is tough on kids, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it is easy to transition to adoption. What can you do to make this move easier. Our guests will be Kim Phagan-Hansel, editor of Fostering Families Today magazine and The Foster Parenting Toolbox; and Madeleine Krebs, Clinical Coordinator at the Center for Adoption Support and Education with over 35 years of experience providing psychotherapy for families with foster and adopted children.

  • Why are some children frightened or resistant to moving from foster care to an adoptive family?

  • What type of behaviors are typical of this transition period?
  • Is this transition easier if the child is being adopted by the foster family?
  • Are children being bounced around from one foster home to another as much now as in the past?
  • How can adoptive parents ease the transition with children adopted from the state or from orphanages abroad?
  • How can foster families ease the transition when they are adopting their foster children?
  • How can new adoptive parents reduce their expectations of themselves and of their children? Should they?
  • Is concurrent planning confusing for foster parents/foster families?
  • How to explain to a child why his foster parents do not want to adopt him?
  • Why is it important to talk positively about our child’s birth parents?
  • Should you talk positively about birth parents if they abused your child?
  • When adopting from foster care, how can you maintain an open relationship with your child’s birth family, biological grandparents, siblings, and foster family?
  • What questions should you ask the foster family when adopting a child they have fostered prior to the adoption?
  • What are some things to do the first night and days home when adopting from foster care?

The Ups & Downs of Adoption: It’s All Worth It!

Source: http://www.today.com/moms/adoption-challenges-its-worth-it-its-not-easy-8C11534082

If you are pregnant, have you considered making an adoption plan if you’re unsure about being ready to parent? 

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Video: More than two million families are looking to adopt, a process that can be filled with background checks, high costs and paperwork. But for Rick and Therese Meyer, the years of waiting and thousands spent before they finally began raising their son, Michael, was all worth it. NBC News’ Kate Snow reports.

When a couple struggles with infertility, their well-meaning friends and family might say to them, “Why don’t you just adopt?”

If only it were that simple. More than two million families are actively trying to adopt, according to government statistics. This morning, one family outside of Chicago shared their adoption story with TODAY’s Kate Snow.

Rick and Therese Meyer both grew up in big families and they knew they wanted children of their own. Shortly after getting married, they even started a college fund for the kid they already knew they wanted. But they had trouble getting pregnant, even after trying expensive rounds of in vitro fertilization, and so they decided to adopt.

Read more

‘With all the love we have’: Couple meet adopted baby on TODAY SHOW

Source: http://www.today.com/moms/all-love-we-have-dutch-couple-adopts-baby-us-8C11547242

Many Americans are unaware that children are adopted to families out side of the US.  What are your thoughts? 

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Video: Watch as a Dutch parents Priscilla and Richard, who have already adopted a boy from the states, meet their new daughter, also born in America, live on TODAY.

International adoption is common in the United States, although parents in other countries are just as eager to adopt.

Meet Priscilla Devries and Richard Dros, who live in the Netherlands and wanted to have biological kids, “but it was medically not meant to be,” they said.

So they turned to adoption, but finding a child born in their native country is virtually impossible, as only one or two babies are put up for adoption each year, the couple said. Next stop: the United States, where a woman who gave birth to a girl last month chose the couple to be the baby’s parents.

Read more

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