Books on Toddler and Older Child Adoption for Adoptive Parents

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Source: https://creatingafamily.org

Toddler Adoption

Toddler Adoption: The Weaver’s Craft by Mary Hopkins-Best. Great information. The author was interviewed on the Creating a Family radio show.

adopting-older-children

Adopting Older Children: A Practical Guide to Adopting and Parenting Children Over Age Four by Stephanie Bosco-Ruggiero, MA; Gloria Russo Wassell, MS, LMHC; and Victor Groza, PhD. – This is a wonderful resource full of practical and hopeful tips for parents who have adopted a child over age four from foster care or through international adoption. The adoption therapist authors do not gloss over potential problems, but they don’t exaggerate them either. Listen to our interview with them on the Creating a Family Radio Show- Parenting Older Adopted Kids: A Practical Guide.

Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care

Siblings in Adoption and Foster Care: Traumatic Separations and Honored Connections by Deborah N. Silverstein and Susan Livingston Smith – This book is a comprehensive resource on issues facing siblings during foster care or adoption – both biological and adopted.

Our Own: Adopting and Parenting the Older Child

Our Own: Adopting and Parenting the Older Child by Trish Maskew

Adopting the Older Child

Adopting the Older Child by Claudia L. Jewett- Written in 1979 but still relevant.

Adopting a Toddler: What Size Shoe Does She Wear?

Adopting a Toddler: What Size Shoes Does She Wear? by Denise Harris Hoppenhauer – Offers great insight and practical advice for those preparing to adopt a toddler.

Nurturing Adoptions

Nurturing Adoptions – Creating Resilience after Neglect and Trauma by Deborah Gray – Anything by Deborah Gray is great. On our show she said this book was primarily written for adoption professionals, but I think adoptive parents will find a lot of useful information as well.

The Connected Child

The Connected Child: Bring Hope and Healing to Your Adoptive Family by Karyn B. Purvis, David R. Cross, and Wendy Lyons Sunshine

Parenting Your Adopted Older Child

Parenting Your Adopted Older Child By Brenda McCreight – Good overview!

Another Place at the Table

Another Place at the Table by Kathy Harrison – I loved this book. It is the true life tale of one foster family and is very well written. I couldn’t put it down.

Children Are Waiting: Every Child Is Worthy of a Permanent Family

Orphans of Serbia

Click here to watch the video.

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Children Are Waiting: Every Child Is Worthy of a Permanent Family

Family Meeting

This is the moment we were finally given Eman to be a part of our family. We were at the Southern Fried Chicken in Accra, Ghana.

Click here to watch the video.

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Children Are Waiting: Every Child Is Worthy of a Permanent Family

Eman ABC and 123 in Ghana

This is during our first meeting with Emmanuel.. We are posting this first because the girls wanted to hear his voice.

Click here to watch video.

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Children Are Waiting: Every Child Is Worthy of a Permanent Family

Eman – I will rise by Chris Tomlin

This video was shot while visiting our son for the first son in Ghana. I simply can’t explain what that moment was like. This moment happened on the 2nd or 3rd day. We were sitting in the orphanage and the children starting to sing.

Click here to watch the video.

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Children Are Waiting: Every Child Is Worthy of a Permanent Family

Welcome Home Godwin Derrick

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Children Are Waiting: Every Child Is Worthy of a Permanent Family

From Ghana to Home

Click here to watch video.

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Adoption Talk: Keeping It Going

If you can’t remember the last time adoption came up at home, it’s time to bring it up. 

Source: https://www.adoptivefamilies.com/talking-about-adoption/adoption-talk-keeping-it-going/

by Gail Steinberg and Beth Hall

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“How will I talk to my child about adoption?”

This is a question every parent asks himself or herself. Even as your new baby takes her first steps, you wonder if you’ll be ready when the questions come. Soon you realize that your child is simply your child, not your “adopted” child, and it becomes difficult even to imagine an adoption talk.

But you’ll have this conversation, not just once, but over time, offering more information as your child matures. Sometimes its coming will take you by surprise, launched by the query of a curious child. Sometimes you’ll see an opening and take it, offering the chance to talk if the feelings fit. The key here is comfort, to create an atmosphere of openness and warmth in which both parent and child feel free to approach a hard topic.

Read more.

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