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Empathy & Encouragement

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NEW WEBINAR: Attending to Needs, Connecting for Life: Dr. Purvis on Attachment

Thursday, February 4, 2016, 7:00 PM CT

REGISTER NOW

Join us as Dr. Karyn Purvis discusses her latest research surrounding attachment and connecting with children who have experienced a tough beginning in life.

With her naturally warm style, Dr. Purvis will share insights to help us better understand and connect with each other.

She will provide practical tips to building a foundation of love, support and security to help your family thrive.

Specific topics include:

  • Connecting principles for attachment needs
  • Techniques to connect with your child at different developmental stages
  • Correcting principles to disarm fear-based behaviors

Click here to register now.

Help Reduce Holiday Melt Downs by Adoption Learning Partners

Just in Time for the Holidays and only $10: Sensory Integration and Self-Regulation

Sensory Integration and Self-Regulation
Presented by Dr. Dan Griffith

REGISTER NOW

Holidays can add joy and connection for families. Lots of sights, sounds, smells and food created specifically for this time of year. 
With all this specialness, however, comes a strong potential for sensory overload. This can mean that special moments of celebration are intermingled with melt downs and tantrums, while parents struggle to stay jolly.

But once you realize what is happening and why, you can intercede to help your child balance things out. Join Clinical Pediatric Psychologist Dan Griffith, Ph.D, as he provides real-life examples so you can:

  • Identify different types of common sensory/regulatory difficulties
  • Work through stresses these difficulties may have on your parent/child relationship
  • Learn intervention strategies to help your family thrive

Click here to learn more and register for only $10 during the month of December. Webinar is regularly priced at $15.

ONLY $10 IN DECEMBER

Questions? Email Mandi or Shane

What I Wish Your Child Knew About Autism

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com

By Shannon Des Roches Rosa for KnowMore.tv

n-SHANNON-large570 My son Leo is 13. He’s a cheerful, curly-haired, soccer playing, iPad-loving, self-taught swimmer. He’s also autistic — one of those 1 in 68 kids, according to the recent CDC report about increased estimated autism rates.

And you might be surprised to hear this, but that increased rate was a relief to me. It confirmed what the autism research community has been saying for years, and what the CDC’s Dr. Colleen Boyle finally stated outright: "It may be that we’re getting better at identifying autism." It means autistic people have always been here. It’s evidence my son is neither damaged nor broken — he’s an example of human variation, like any kid.

Though, obviously, Leo is not like most kids when it comes to specifics like talking and learning and tolerating crowds. I used to let Leo’s autistic differences upset me: I came from outside the disability community (our society tends to be scared of autism), and I simply didn’t know any better. I’ve since come to understand that my job as Leo’s mother is to accept him for who he is, get him the accommodations he needs (and he needs a lot of them), and fight as hard as I can to make the world a more autism-friendly place, especially now that we have better estimates on how many Leos there are on this planet — Leos of all ages.

Read more.

Hopscotch + Arbonne + You = Support for Waiting Child Adoptions!

ARBONNE Is Supporting Hopscotch Adoptions’ Special Needs Grant Fund

For a limited time, Sandie Buscarino, a former Hopscotch Adoptions client, is sponsoring a fundraiser to benefit Hopscotch Adoptions Special Needs Grants.   These grants help offset expenses related to the adoption of children with non-correctable needs.   Sandie is an adoptive parent of an Armenian angel (ok, he’s a little boy so only 90% angel!) who had a correctable special need (cleft lip/palate).  Sandie understands the emotional and financial obstacles adoptive parents face when considering adopting a child with special needs.  These children often become Waiting Children and Hopscotch is devoted to doing all they can to assist parents in finding them their forever families. 

Sandie shared "As a way of thanking them for helping us navigate a long and winding journey to complete our family, Sandie has pledged to donate 75% of the proceeds of Arbonne sales placed through 9/30/15 to Hopscotch Adoptions’ Special Needs Grants."

If you are not familiar with Arbonne, Sandie would like you to know "Arbonne is a botanically based, environmentally friendly products line of skincare, makeup and nutrition, to nurture your body inside and out.  Arbonne products are formulated to be highly effective, without harmful chemicals or artificial ingredients."

Taking care of yourself, helps waiting children into permanent families that otherwise would not have a family.

Sincerely,
Robin E. Sizemore, Executive Director
Hopscotch Adoptions, Inc

Sandie Buscarino
Arbonne Independent Consultant, ID: 14586263
Cell (631) 816-5813

Visit sandiebuscarino.arbonne.com to see what Arbonne is all about.  Be sure to check out her holiday items that are only available while supplies last.  She can provide samples of some products if you request, and answer any questions you may have.  You also have the opportunity to join as a preferred client of Sandie and save 20% off all products for one year! Just include "HS" after your last name so that the Hopscotch Adoptions gets the credit.

Offer Expires: September 30, 2015

Why You Should Not Welcome My Child With Special Needs Into Your Church

ezra field I realize this may be one of the most controversial posts I have ever written. It has taken me months of writing, stopping, coming back, re-writing and I’m still not positive it’s perfect. But it is my heart. Every fiber of my being burns with passion over this topic. I want to share with you why you should NOT welcome my special needs child to your church.

I write this from what I believe is a unique perspective.  You see, I have worked in ministry for over ten years now. I have been on staff as a youth pastor and a children’s pastor. I have helped to develop a special needs program within a church setting. I have also been a teacher for five years collectively. I have taught classrooms full of children from all kinds of backgrounds, strengths, and weaknesses. Most importantly, I am a mother to two beautiful children, one of whom has Autism. That’s right, I am the parent of a special needs child.  So why on earth would someone with my background write a blog like this? Allow me to share my heart with you.  These are the reasons I believe you should NOT welcome my special needs child to your church.

Read more.

‘Gotcha Day,’ Meeting Your Adopted Child by Michael Hicks

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/patrick-hicks/gotcha-day-meeting-your-adopted-child_b_7102480.html

By Patrick Hicks

On the eve of his son’s adoption from South Korea, one writer looks back on what that night now means

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Most parents go to a hospital to meet their child for the first time. My wife and I went to the Omaha airport, and it was there, shortly before midnight, that our internationally-adopted son arrived from South Korea. He was 51 weeks old.

It was a joyful and overwhelming moment for us, but for him, it was obviously terrifying. Who were these people? Where was his foster mother? Why was a stranger holding him and where was he being taken? Everything he knew was gone. Missing. Even now, five years later, if I close my eyes, I can still hear his shrieks of terror.

Read more.

Fact: Parents Shape A Child’s Brain

Source: http://www.npr.org/blogs/health

szalay_ro_1992_izadoroceanbeach.3-xl_wide-717d3b8e62be61749fcff2086ef0f710431a1b69-s800-c85 Parents do a lot more than make sure a child has food and shelter, researchers say. They play a critical role in brain development.

More than a decade of research on children raised in institutions shows that "neglect is awful for the brain," says Charles Nelson, a professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and Boston Children’s Hospital. Without someone who is a reliable source of attention, affection and stimulation, he says, "the wiring of the brain goes awry." The result can be long-term mental and emotional problems.

A lot of what scientists know about parental bonding and the brain comes from studies of children who spent time in Romanian orphanages during the 1980s and 1990s. Children like Izidor Ruckel, who wrote a book about his experiences.

Read more.

Anything You Can Do…. I Can Too!

See video.

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