Blaming The Parents Of Children With Special Needs

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com

By Shawna Wingert, Contributor

58b835e31a00001500f41314

Since the day my first baby was born, I have felt responsible for my children’s differences.

Not responsible in the “I’m the momma so I need to help my child” kinda way (although I certainly feel that too).

Responsible in the “Why do you let him sleep with you instead of in the crib, eat the ice cream instead of the meat, allow him to make the mess, help him in the bathroom when he is almost ten” kinda way.

I have been blamed, at one point or another, for every single one of my boys’ differences. Moreover, as we have received diagnosis after diagnosis, I find the blame comes even more frequently now ― not less.

Read more.

Advertisements

What I Wish Your Child Knew About Autism

Source: http://www.huffingtonpost.com

By Shannon Des Roches Rosa for KnowMore.tv

n-SHANNON-large570 My son Leo is 13. He’s a cheerful, curly-haired, soccer playing, iPad-loving, self-taught swimmer. He’s also autistic — one of those 1 in 68 kids, according to the recent CDC report about increased estimated autism rates.

And you might be surprised to hear this, but that increased rate was a relief to me. It confirmed what the autism research community has been saying for years, and what the CDC’s Dr. Colleen Boyle finally stated outright: "It may be that we’re getting better at identifying autism." It means autistic people have always been here. It’s evidence my son is neither damaged nor broken — he’s an example of human variation, like any kid.

Though, obviously, Leo is not like most kids when it comes to specifics like talking and learning and tolerating crowds. I used to let Leo’s autistic differences upset me: I came from outside the disability community (our society tends to be scared of autism), and I simply didn’t know any better. I’ve since come to understand that my job as Leo’s mother is to accept him for who he is, get him the accommodations he needs (and he needs a lot of them), and fight as hard as I can to make the world a more autism-friendly place, especially now that we have better estimates on how many Leos there are on this planet — Leos of all ages.

Read more.

Kybele E-News, Fall 2012

Greetings from Down Under! I had the pleasure of recently representing Kybele at the 71stNational Scientific Congress of the Australian Society of Anaesthetists’ meeting held in Hobart, Tasmania September 28-October 2, 2012. The theme of the meeting, “Pushing the Boundaries”, was indeed that, as friends and distinguished speakers from across the globe came to discuss improving healthcare standards in low and middle resource settings.

Prior to traveling to Hobart, I attended the 3rd “Global Burden of Surgical Disease” meeting in Melbourne. The goal of the meeting was to assemble surgeons, anesthesiologists, policy makers and others to discuss challenges facing surgery and anesthesia in developing countries.

On a global scale, few people actually receive the surgery they need, including emergency cesarean section and obstetric care, resulting in premature death and disability.  This gravely impacts the individual family, as well as society, in many parts of the world.

On a global scale, few people actually receive the surgery they need, including emergency cesarean section and obstetric care, resulting in premature death and disability.  This gravely impacts the individual family, as well as society, in many parts of the world.

Both venues offered rich opportunities for networking with other organizations and individuals passionate about improving the quality and capacity of global health. As a community, we need to learn and discuss which interventions really work! In September 2013, Kybele will have the opportunity to help shape a future interdisciplinary global health meeting as the Alliance for Surgery and Anesthesia Presence will be organized by Kybele secretary, Dr. Holly Muir, at Duke University Medical Center.

Stay tuned.

Medge Owen, President
Kybele, Inc.

Read more…

%d bloggers like this: