Pure Joy!

9-Year-Old With Down Syndrome Belts Out Whitney Houston Song in Viral Video

Source: www.yahoo.com

By Maya Chung

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A 9-year-old boy with Down syndrome has gone viral after his heartwarming version of one of Whitney Houston’s hit songs was posted online.

Dane Miller, of Texas, belted out Houston’s “I Have Nothing” while riding in the car with his dad on Monday, but his mother, Danna Miller, said it’s something her son does often.

“He’s been musical since around 2 years old,” Miller told InsideEdition.com. “He’s been playing the drums. He sings. He loves music. He puts his whole heart into everything he does.”

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The Most Awesome Proposal Ever!

Source: https://www.yahoo.com

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STONEWARE WITH THE CHARM OF THINGS IMPERFECT AND SIMPLE by Christian Royal

Source: https://www.christianroyalpottery.com

home_welcome_image_grandeTHE POTTERY – Christian Royal Pottery is high-fired stoneware that is handmade using slab-building techniques. The stoneware incorporates the natural splendor of leaves or the artistry of beautiful laces, which are shaped into flowing designs and functional forms. The making of stoneware involves numerous steps over several days. Each piece involves Christian and his assistants in a collaborative effort, following many sequential steps. While some of the pieces may be similar, none are identical due to the process. Handcrafting produces variations in size, shape, color saturation, depth of impression, and minor imperfections that give each piece part of its appeal. Thus, the studio adage: Stoneware With The Charm of Things Imperfect and Simple

THE POTTER – Christian Royal is a young man with Down syndrome who struggles with single words and has yet to grasp basic addition or time.  However, since his teen years, Christian has shown an interest in, and aptitude for, working with clay. Christian was unable to “do” school as other students did and began making pottery as part of his homeschooling program.  Since his first lesson with Kris Neal of Fire And Earth Pottery, pottery has increasingly become the  focus of his life.  Over the years, through many providential happenings, kind-hearted people have offered their expertise and help at just the right time for each step of what is now Christian Royal Pottery. Foremost are John and Jan Myers, professional potters, who inexplicably offered to teach Christian the methods and techniques they had developed over thirty years. They made this offer the first time we ever met them. A week later we had unpacked our bags in their home and were sitting in their studio as John began to instruct Christian.  John and Jan’s teaching of Christian enabled him to produce a style of pottery that captures simplicity and charm in its essence.

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Model With Down Syndrome Challenges Beauty Stereotypes: BORN DIFFERENT

Source: https://www.yahoo.com

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THE first model with Down Syndrome to front a beauty campaign is hoping to shake up the industry and prove that “beauty belongs to everybody.” Katie Meade is the first to admit that people with Down Syndrome, as well as other disabilities, are largely absent from the beauty and fashion industries – and she’s determined to change it. The 33-year-old made history last year when she became the first ever model with Down Syndrome to be the face of a beauty brand and her career – both as a model and as an ambassador for people with learning disabilities – continues to grow.

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It’s Not Scary. It’s Beautiful.

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News From Armenia: A loving son, a fun brother – a fulfilling life.

Source: http://digital.olivesoftware.com

By Katie Martin

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Some events in life are priceless such as weddings, graduations or births.

But for Christie Orta, an important life moment was a simple trip to the beach a couple of weeks ago.

“That one moment was worth more than every penny we paid and every tear that I cried, just to see him sitting in the ocean,” Christie said as she showed a video of her newly adopted son, Edgar, 4, playing in the surf.

“He was so excited he didn’t know what to do with himself,” she said. “He was flapping his arms so hard I’m surprised he didn’t fly away, he was just so excited.”

Since 2013 Christie and her husband, Raymundo Orta, have been working through the adoption process to bring Edgar, who has Down syndrome, home from Armenia. In February, they, along with their biological daughter, Laura, 9, officially became a family of four, bringing Edgar home to Savannah.

“I think he has completed our family in ways that we never thought he would. He’s made us a better family,” Christie said. “People have said he’s so blessed to be in a family now, but I think the opposite. We’re so blessed to have him.”

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News from Armenia: Sam’s Welcome Home!

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News from Armenia: WELCOME HOME SAM!!!!

Source: http://www.mlive.com

By Angie Jackson

-a9157422d62d8e87 GRAND RAPIDS, MI – Smiling and laughing through tears, Sam Bode’s new extended family erupted into cheers as they spotted the 4-year-old and his adoptive parents at Gerald R. Ford International Airport.

Moments before, the huddle of grandparents, aunts, an uncle and cousins had grown quiet from nervousness and excitement. Over the past two years, they’ve only been able to communicate with the cheerful boy via Facetime while his parents, Erica and Jeff Bode, went through the lengthy process to adopt him from Armenia. On Wednesday night, he was officially welcomed into the tight-knit West Michigan family.

Sam, who has Down syndrome, arrived at the airport with the Bodes and their son Jack, 8, after the last leg of their trip home from Armenia. He has spent his entire life in an orphanage.

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She Inspired Those With Down Syndrome As Unstoppable

Source: www.washingtonpost.com

By Theresa Vargas

pioneer_2016030902731457556429 Laura Lee took pride in her résumé. On it, separated by bold lettering and bullet points, she listed one achievement after another: She graduated from George Mason University. She worked at the World Bank. She volunteered at a food bank. She spoke at national conventions.

Not mentioned: She was born with Down syndrome.

For the 400,000 Americans like her who are often characterized by their limitations, Lee changed what they and their families viewed as possible. She was the first person with Down syndrome many people saw participate on panels. Or go to college. Or work in a professional setting. At the World Bank, where she was an office assistant earning $12.24 an hour, her name was on her office door. If the cruelest part of Down syndrome comes from the walls it erects, the ultimate joy for many people in the intellectual-disabilities community came in watching Lee leap over those walls, time and again. In many ways, she seemed unstoppable — until she wasn’t.

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Parents Speak Out a Year After Dad ‘Chose’ Son With Down Syndrome Over Wife

A year ago Samuel Forrest’s life abruptly changed forever. In the span of just a few days he gained a son, began divorce proceedings with his wife and found himself the focus of a lot of media attention.

(Photo: Samuel Forrest)

Now, a year later, Forrest and his wife have reconciled.

Leo Forrest was born with Down syndrome on January 21, 2015 in Yerevan, Armenia. After he was diagnosed, his mother, Ruzan Forrest, gave his dad, Samuel Forrest, an ultimatum: if he decided to keep the baby, she’d file for divorce.

Samuel Forrest decided not to have Leo placed for adoption.

“They took me in to see him and I looked at this guy and I said, he’s beautiful, he’s perfect,” Forrest told ABC News last year. “I’m absolutely keeping him.”

Forrest decided he and Leo would move back to Auckland, New Zealand, where he is from, and his wife remained in Armenia and began divorce proceedings.

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