Happy St. Patrick’s Day!

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Happy New Year to Your Family from Hopscotch Adoptions, Inc

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Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays From Your Hopscotch Family!

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Happy Father’s Day from Hopscotch Adoptions

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Thinking of you now and always. 

Happy Father’s Day from your friends at

Hopscotch Adoptions.

The Whole World Loves You! Your friends from Hopscotch

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Merry Christmas from Ukraine!

See video: Ukrainian Christmas Carol

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Merry Christmas from Georgia!

Unique Traditions For New Year And Christmas In Georgia

By Kidworldcitizen

e082a9ef10607de9e792544f18bd16d1 The traditional Georgian Christmas tree, called chichilaki in Georgian, is not green. Georgians have been making the Georgian-style Christmas tree since ancient times. Environmentally friendly Chichilaki originated in the provinces of Guria and Samegrelo, the western part of the country.Chichilaki was decorated with the two bow-shaped items called Kalpi and Bokeri. Kalpi was made from ivy leafs and Bokeli was a bread baked with eggs, flour, and cheese both as the symbols of life and fertility.

At first sight, nutwood twigs with long fluffy shavings may seem quite unattractive if you are used to lush green, fir-tree branches. The curly shavings, which the master removes moving upwards from the bottom, are called basila in honor of St. Basily’s beard, the patron saint of animals and harbinger of new happiness. A wooden cross is usually attached to the top of the chichilaki and the tree itself is invariably decorated elegantly with fruits, berries and flowers. Unfortunately, this beauty doesn’t stay long: after the holidays, people burn their trees, symbolizing that the previous year’s misfortunes go up in smoke.

More familiar Christmas concepts have a place in Georgian festivities, as well. Santa Claus, known as tovlis bubua (Grandpa Snow), is usually depicted wearing traditional Georgian clothes and a fur cloak called a nabadi. Although Grandpa Snow doesn’t have reindeer, but he still is believed to visit homes on Christmas Eve, leaving presents for the children.

Mekvele is another typically Georgian New Year’s tradition.  The first person to come into one’s house on New Year’s with “happy feet’ symbolically brings in joy and prosperity. He or she is showered with candies and in return presents the hosts a basket with delicacies wishing the upcoming year to be satisfying and sweet.  Those said to have “happy feet” are invited to Georgian households to provide good luck for the family.

Merry Christmas!!!!

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Christmas lights around the world: How we light up the holidays @CNNTravel. TBILISI !!

See slideshow.

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Help Reduce Holiday Melt Downs by Adoption Learning Partners

Just in Time for the Holidays and only $10: Sensory Integration and Self-Regulation

Sensory Integration and Self-Regulation
Presented by Dr. Dan Griffith

REGISTER NOW

Holidays can add joy and connection for families. Lots of sights, sounds, smells and food created specifically for this time of year. 
With all this specialness, however, comes a strong potential for sensory overload. This can mean that special moments of celebration are intermingled with melt downs and tantrums, while parents struggle to stay jolly.

But once you realize what is happening and why, you can intercede to help your child balance things out. Join Clinical Pediatric Psychologist Dan Griffith, Ph.D, as he provides real-life examples so you can:

  • Identify different types of common sensory/regulatory difficulties
  • Work through stresses these difficulties may have on your parent/child relationship
  • Learn intervention strategies to help your family thrive

Click here to learn more and register for only $10 during the month of December. Webinar is regularly priced at $15.

ONLY $10 IN DECEMBER

Questions? Email Mandi or Shane

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