International Adoption MUST Be Rescued.

Source: http://dailycaller.com

By Jennifer Shaw

courtesy-of-Jennifer-Shaw

International adoption has been declining at an alarming rate. Nearly 23,000 international children were adopted by U.S. families in 2004, but in 2016 less than 4,000 children were adopted, a drop of 80 percent. If this trend continues, international adoption will cease to exist by 2022. The United Nations estimates that 15 million children have lost both parents. Thousands upon thousands of children are waiting in institutions for families they can call their own. Here are five reasons I think international adoption needs rescuing:

Adoption saves lives

This may seem to go without saying, but I find that many people who have not looked into international adoption do not understand that for many vulnerable children, adoption to another country is their only chance to have a family. And in many cases, where medical care is poor or unavailable, it is their only chance to live. Our son, Noah, had been waiting with his paperwork completed for over five years. With his critical heart condition, no one had stepped forward, and even if a family in his birth country had been open to adopting him, the medical care he needed was not available there. He would have died without international adoption. Since joining our family at age 9, he has had life-saving surgery, a complete change in his quality of life physically, and the security and love of a permanent family. While I personally believe that children should stay with their birth families or be adopted within their birth culture if possible, the fact remains that there are a significant number of children for whom this is just not feasible. These children need international adoption, and we need to put the welfare of vulnerable children at the top of our priority list as a nation.

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Regulatory Orphans – WORLD

Adoption advocates worry new rules on international adoption will leave more children languishing in orphanages

by Jamie Dean

Regulatory orphans

Orphans at the Zhytomyr Orphanage in Ukraine (Oleksandr Rupeta/NurPhoto/Getty Images)

When Michelet Joseph arrived in the United States in the summer of 2015, the small Haitian boy couldn’t pull up or stand up on his own.

Michelet was nearly 7 years old.

Born with hydrocephalus, Michelet was 11 months old when his mother died. His father had abandoned the family. Michelet spent the next year in a mountain village north of Port-au-Prince, lying on the floor while his grandfather farmed.

When Michelet’s grandfather could no longer care for him, the toddler went to live in a nearby orphanage run by American missionaries. At 2 years old, Michelet was malnourished, couldn’t hold up his head, and was covered in sores.

In the fall of 2011, a visiting neurosurgeon from the United States performed surgery to relieve Michelet’s hydrocephalus, but his tiny body had atrophied, and he was unable to use his legs. Haitian hospitals didn’t have the resources for the rehabilitation and additional surgeries he’d need in the future.

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Road to foreign adoption leads to happiness

A big thank you to the Homan family for such a great story of advocacy in addition. #saveadoptions.

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Source: https://www.dailystandard.com

By Sydney Albert

FORT RECOVERY – The adoption process is a long and challenging road that can sometimes end in heartbreak.

A local mother who has adopted internationally five times, however, says welcoming a child in need into the family is well worth the effort.

Alison Homan and her husband, Ted, had always wanted a big family. They had said they wanted four children, and during the first two and a half years of marriage, Alison Homan delivered three babies. However, one child didn’t live long after birth, and the back-to-back pregnancies were taking their toll on Homan, who didn’t feel she could handle another one.

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Bucking Trump Deregulation Agenda, State Department Chokes International Adoption

Adoption advocates say the State Department is making international adoption rarer and more expensive than ever to consolidate government control over private agencies.

Source: thefederalist.com

By Jayme Metzgar

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In September 2016, just as the presidential race was entering its final weeks, the State Department quietly proposed new regulations governing international adoption. Adoption advocates sounded the alarm, saying the regulations would severely hamper Americans’ ability to adopt overseas. I wrote about this for The Federalist just days before the November election.

Then, to almost everyone’s surprise, Donald Trump was elected president. On the day of his inauguration, Trump began a regulatory reform effort, announcing a moratorium on all new regulations from executive agencies. Ten days later, he issued an executive order requiring agencies to repeal two regulations for every new one they proposed.

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Photolistings for International Adoption May Be Banned – Please Help!

The US Department of State is considering banning photolistings for children available for international adoption.

US State Department to ban international adoption photolistings

There is a lot we don’t know and the State Department has not issued a final rule, but they are currently considering whether the practice of “soft referrals” is a violation of their regulations. We have not seen an official definition of “soft referral” but it appears to include photolisting—or more specifically allowing international adoption agencies to place a child who is on a photolist.

Photolisting is a common practice in both foster care adoption and international adoption. In fact, it is considered best practice in child welfare for finding homes for harder-to-place children–older kids, kids with health issues, and sibling groups.

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What Is All The Commotion In International Adoption? Watch this video and share!

Take these steps:

  • Watch this short 3 minute video.
  • Familiarize yourself with the problem and solution facing inter-country adoption.
  • Share this video on your personal Facebook page.
  • Share this video on your agency Facebook page.
  • Forward to adoptive families

Adoptions Have Dropped 72% Since 2005 – Heres Why! by Mark Montgomery AP Feb 28, 2017

Source: http://newsok.com

(The Conversation is an independent and nonprofit source of news, analysis and commentary from academic experts.)

Mark Montgomery, Grinnell College and Irene Powell, Grinnell College

(THE CONVERSATION) When Ethiopia stopped allowing its children to be adopted by foreign parents in January, it became the latest country to eliminate or sharply curtail the practice. In recent decades South Korea, Romania, Guatemala, China, Kazakhstan and Russia – all former leaders in foreign adoption – have also banned or cut back on international custody transfers.

In 2005, almost 46,000 children were adopted across borders, roughly half of them headed to a new life in the United States. By 2015 international adoptions had dropped 72 percent, to 12,000 in total. Just 5,500 of these children ended up in the U.S., with the remainder landing in Italy and Spain.

Today, most children adopted internationally come from China, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Ukraine. But even China, which has been the top sending country since the late 1990s, has decreased its foreign adoptions by 86 percent.

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I DON’T KNOW ABOUT THAT!!!

I’d like to thank Associated Press Reporter, David Crary, for his work on this article. Thank you David!!!

I would also like to point out that no one is defending the 1 agency that was debarred over the last 9 years, and in the same breath….. in no way does this one debarment justify a jump from the Council on Accreditation’s 4 full time staff and an annual budget of 147K with 20 volunteer evaluators comprised of adoption agency professionals with vast clinical and agency management experience to IAAME’s budget of over 2.5 million + (in fees paid in by families ultimately since adoption agencies are fee for service based models) and 23 full time staff, without the clinical and agency management experience model Council on Accreditation has

Consider this dollar amount when Hague Accredited agencies have accumulated some 170 substantiated complaints (many are administrative in nature) over a 9 year period: over 87,000 children have come home to American families, of those what is the cost of each complaint.  Under Council of Accreditation, 170 complaints/$147K annual budget = $1,023.53 per complaint vs IAAME’s 170/$2.5 million + annual budget = $14,705.88 per complaint.  You may want to do the math for yourself. In addition, IAAME will assess the agency cost for at least two evaluator’s travel expenses associated with the complaint should they feel an onsite visit or travel to the foreign country is warranted. Add on another $4,000.00 – $40,000.00 Does this sound reasonable to you? 

The public should also know Mr. Stephen Pennypacker, IAAME’s CEO, explained why the $500 nonrefundable client fee is urgently needed to be paid now. Much to Pennypacker’s credit for his honesty, the immediacy is attributed to the need for recouping IAAME’s startup costs. You read that right.

Have you ever heard of any other business sector where a startup nonprofit, designated to be your watchdog, also holds you accountable for paying their startup costs?

Friends, we have entered the Twilight Zone.  Please sign the petition and send a complaint to congress if you feel this is unacceptable. 

Parents Adopting Children to See Higher Fees, New Rules

Senator Wicker Has Taken A Bold Stand for Vulnerable Children and American Families!

Senator Wicker has taken a bold step for Vulnerable Children and American Families! We need to make sure we have his back.  Please post the attached letter to your Facebook page and urge your friends to like and share as well.  We need to keep the momentum going!!

Click here to read the letter (PDF)

Click here to download an image of the letter to post to Facebook (JPG)

International Adoptions Completed from Bulgaria in 2017

Bulgarian shop 2018

*The Bulgarian Ministry of Justice has released the 2017 statistics for intercountry adoptions. As in the past, more than 1/3 of all adoptions were for identified waiting children with special needs. The remaining procedures were direct matches made by MOJ between a registered family and a child cleared for international adoption but not yet entered into the Waiting Child Register. Many of these main procedure referrals likely also had identified special needs. The overall number of completed adoptions from Bulgaria decreased in 2017.*

  • USA – 104 total procedures, including 78 for identified waiting children
  • Italy – 36 total procedures, including 1 for identified waiting children
  • Spain – 22 total procedures, including 1 for identified waiting children
  • France – 21 total procedures
  • Netherlands – 13 total procedures
  • Canada – 7 total procedures, including 2 for identified waiting children
  • Ireland – 6 total procedures
  • Germany – 4 total procedures
  • Denmark – 4 total procedures
  • Norway – 4 total procedures
  • Belgium – 3 total procedures, including 2 for identified waiting children
  • Luxembourg – 1 procedure
  • Cyprus – 1 procedure

TOTAL – 226 total procedures for 306 children, including 84 procedures for 133 identified waiting children

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