I DON’T KNOW ABOUT THAT!!!

I’d like to thank Associated Press Reporter, David Crary, for his work on this article. Thank you David!!!

I would also like to point out that no one is defending the 1 agency that was debarred over the last 9 years, and in the same breath….. in no way does this one debarment justify a jump from the Council on Accreditation’s 4 full time staff and an annual budget of 147K with 20 volunteer evaluators comprised of adoption agency professionals with vast clinical and agency management experience to IAAME’s budget of over 2.5 million + (in fees paid in by families ultimately since adoption agencies are fee for service based models) and 23 full time staff, without the clinical and agency management experience model Council on Accreditation has

Consider this dollar amount when Hague Accredited agencies have accumulated some 170 substantiated complaints (many are administrative in nature) over a 9 year period: over 87,000 children have come home to American families, of those what is the cost of each complaint.  Under Council of Accreditation, 170 complaints/$147K annual budget = $1,023.53 per complaint vs IAAME’s 170/$2.5 million + annual budget = $14,705.88 per complaint.  You may want to do the math for yourself. In addition, IAAME will assess the agency cost for at least two evaluator’s travel expenses associated with the complaint should they feel an onsite visit or travel to the foreign country is warranted. Add on another $4,000.00 – $40,000.00 Does this sound reasonable to you? 

The public should also know Mr. Stephen Pennypacker, IAAME’s CEO, explained why the $500 nonrefundable client fee is urgently needed to be paid now. Much to Pennypacker’s credit for his honesty, the immediacy is attributed to the need for recouping IAAME’s startup costs. You read that right.

Have you ever heard of any other business sector where a startup nonprofit, designated to be your watchdog, also holds you accountable for paying their startup costs?

Friends, we have entered the Twilight Zone.  Please sign the petition and send a complaint to congress if you feel this is unacceptable. 

Parents Adopting Children to See Higher Fees, New Rules

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Senator Wicker Has Taken A Bold Stand for Vulnerable Children and American Families!

Senator Wicker has taken a bold step for Vulnerable Children and American Families! We need to make sure we have his back.  Please post the attached letter to your Facebook page and urge your friends to like and share as well.  We need to keep the momentum going!!

Click here to read the letter (PDF)

Click here to download an image of the letter to post to Facebook (JPG)

International Adoptions Completed from Bulgaria in 2017

Bulgarian shop 2018

*The Bulgarian Ministry of Justice has released the 2017 statistics for intercountry adoptions. As in the past, more than 1/3 of all adoptions were for identified waiting children with special needs. The remaining procedures were direct matches made by MOJ between a registered family and a child cleared for international adoption but not yet entered into the Waiting Child Register. Many of these main procedure referrals likely also had identified special needs. The overall number of completed adoptions from Bulgaria decreased in 2017.*

  • USA – 104 total procedures, including 78 for identified waiting children
  • Italy – 36 total procedures, including 1 for identified waiting children
  • Spain – 22 total procedures, including 1 for identified waiting children
  • France – 21 total procedures
  • Netherlands – 13 total procedures
  • Canada – 7 total procedures, including 2 for identified waiting children
  • Ireland – 6 total procedures
  • Germany – 4 total procedures
  • Denmark – 4 total procedures
  • Norway – 4 total procedures
  • Belgium – 3 total procedures, including 2 for identified waiting children
  • Luxembourg – 1 procedure
  • Cyprus – 1 procedure

TOTAL – 226 total procedures for 306 children, including 84 procedures for 133 identified waiting children

Harder to bring them home: Advocates worried over barriers to international adoption

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Mitchell and Dustin Shoumaker adopted siblings Gabe, 8, Maisy, 5, Evangeline, 3, and Olivia, 7 from Poland. The Tupelo couple and other advocates are concerned changes in international adoption could make it harder for others to open their hearts and homes.

When Mitchell and Dustin Shoumaker adopted siblings Gabe, Olivia and Maisy from Poland in December 2015, they knew they had unfinished business.

The Tupelo couple found out their three children had an infant sibling the night before they went to court in Poland, but little Evangeline wasn’t yet available for adoption. It took longer to adopt one child than three, even though Polish law favors keeping sibling groups together.

“Our first experience took nine months,” Mitchell Shoumaker said. “The second time, it took a year and a half.”

Some of the delay was specific to issues in Poland, but the Tupelo couple was also impacted by changes in the way intercountry adoptions are handled in the United States.

“It just took longer in America and Poland,” Mitchell Shoumaker said.

The Shoumakers consider themselves lucky. Evangeline was transferred to the same loving foster family that took care of her older siblings, and the Shoumakers were able to remain in contact with them during the process. They were able to bring the 3-year-old home to Tupelo this summer, and she is doing well.

“We are beyond thankful for that family because they loved our children so well,” Dustin Shoumaker said.

Continue reading.

Your Department of State Will Now Take A Non-refundable $500 Fee Per Child. You’re Okay With That, Right?

Dear international adoption families, are you aware the Dept. of State is now requiring an additional $500 fee for every adopted child at the time of application, starting Feb. 15? (non-refundable).

Click here to learn more.

International Adoption Clinic – LIVE Seminar Registration – March 3rd

Download PDF Flyer>

FLYER - IAC Adoption Boot Camp

Panel of Parents Adopting Older Kids: Surviving that 1st Year – Creating a Family

Source: https://creatingafamily.org/

panel-older-adopted-children

Adopting and fostering older kids is hard for both the child and the parent, especially the first year. A panel of moms who have adopted older kids share their tips for surviving the first year home. Host Dawn Davenport, Executive Director of Creating a Family, the national infertility & adoption education and support nonprofit, interviews Melissa Basham, mom to 4 boys adopted from foster care; Abigail Betancourt, mom to 2 kids adopted from foster care; Jan Egozi, mom to one child adopted internationally; and Shelley McMullen, mom to 1 child adopted internationally.

Listen to podcast.

There Are No Unwanted Children: Just Unfound Families

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NOTICE FOR LATVIA ADOPTIVE FAMILIES: Post Adoption Reports

NOTICE: Latvia – Post Adoption Reports

This Alert Supersedes the Alert Issued on November 17, 2016

The Ministry of Welfare has informed the Department that they are still missing post-adoption reports from U.S. families who adopted children from Latvia. The Ministry has urged the Department to stress the importance of post-adoption report submission to adoption service providers and adoptive families. For this reason, the Department strongly urges you to comply with Latvia’s post-adoption requirements. Compliance with Latvia’s post-adoption reporting requirements would also contribute to an understanding of the positive impact that intercountry adoption has for children from Latvia who are living in the United States.

Latvian law requires that two post-adoption reports be submitted: one after the first year following the adoption and one after the second year. Reports should be notarized and contain an Apostille certification. Two extra months are allowed for translation and submission of the report. Post-adoption reports must be submitted with a translation in Latvian. The reports can be conducted by the adoptive family’s adoption service provider or the appropriate child welfare officials in the state where the child resides.

The reports must be submitted to the Latvian Ministry of Welfare by mail:

Latvian Adoption Authority
Children and Family Policy Department
Ministry of Welfare
28 Skolas St.
Riga, Latvia, LV-1331

If your report will not arrive by November 1, please also send an electronic version to the following email address, while the hard copy is in route: lm@lm.gov.lv.

Please continue to monitor travel.state.gov for updated information on adoption in Latvia

Join Us This Thursday: All About The Birth Family Search

Birth Family Search | Adoption Learning Partners

Register Now

Open records, DNA testing, family tree websites, social media, Google, orphanage searches by other families, even a birth relative doing a reverse search to find information on your child; all can lead quite quickly to an unscheduled, and unprepared for, reunion.

The question is no longer IF your child will one day (sooner rather than later) be able to locate a birth relative, but when. For most domestic adoptees, it is now just a matter of time. For international adoptees, the search is becoming easier and easier.

Join Martha Osborne, adoptee, adoptive mother, and founder of RainbowKids.com, as she shares the realities of birth family search today and provides tips and tools to make informed choices, including:

  1. Talking to your pre-teen and teen about searching
  2. Gauging if your child is emotionally ready to conduct a search
  3. How to handle a birth relative reaching out directly through social media or email
  4. Identifying safety risks and how to avoid them
  5. The tools available today both for search and for obtaining a medical profile on an adoptee without allowing DNA information to be released

Click here to learn more and register >

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