KEEP THE PROMISE 2017!

The Office of Children’s Issues at the U.S. Department of State has declared May 15th Post-Adoption Report Day. It’s an opportunity to highlight the importance that parents who have adopted through intercountry adoption keep their promises and submit post-adoption reports as they committed to during the adoption process.

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Here are 3 simple reasons NCFA believes Post-Adoption Reporting matters!

  1. You promised!
    As a part of the adoption process, you were entrusted with the care of your child and promised to share about their future experiences. While it is easy to forget about extra paperwork in the important work of caring for your children, we think keeping your promise to report back on the wellbeing of your child is critically important.
  2. It’s a great opportunity for reflection.
    Post-adoption reports are a good time to do some reflection and assessment. Consider your reporting dates an opportunity, not an obligation.  You can review and celebrate progress and milestones. Take a moment to consider what types of support might help your child (and you!) to grow and thrive. And consider what your goals are for your child and your family between now and the next reporting date. It’s also a terrific time to touch base with your adoption agency or other adoption professionals if you need any support. For some countries, you’re required to connect with your agency at this time anyway. It’s a natural and convenient time to touch base about any questions, concerns, or supports your family might find valuable.
  3. You’re helping to support future adoptions.
    Post-adoption reports are one of the ways countries assess whether children are healthy, safe, and loved as a result of intercountry adoption. This information can be critical to deciding whether future children will have the option to join families through intercountry adoption or might otherwise languish in institutions or other impermanent situations.

So, what exactly is a post-adoption report? While the number and timing of reports required varies, generally the report’s goal is to discuss the child’s development and adjustment to a new family, home, and country. It’s important to pay special attention to the specific requirements in the country a child is adopted from. The type of information, how it should be assessed (through an agency or by parents themselves), and how it should be submitted can vary widely from country to country. Below, we’ve listed some basic information on several countries reporting requirements. If you have specific questions about what your reporting requirements are, we encourage you to reach out to your adoption service provider to learn more. Department of State also provides country specific information and can be contacted if you need more information.

Post-Adoption Report Requirements

We aren’t listing in detail all the country requirements, but wanted to give examples of some common countries of origin and their general guidelines, we’ve also linked through to more specific information at Department of State for each country. Of course, the best way to get information on what is required for your adoption is always to contact your adoption service provider and confirm what was required by the country at the time of your adoption and any other requirements the agency might have that you agreed to during the adoption process.

Bulgaria: 4 reports required. One every six months after adoption for first two years.

China: 6 reports required. Six months after adoption and at 1,2,3,4, and 5 years after adoption. First 3 reports must be prepared by the social workers who prepared the homestudy. Families may write last three reports themselves.

Colombia: 4 reports—signed by social worker—at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months from the date of the final court decree which is signed while the family is in Colombia.

Ethiopia: Post-adoption reports are required at 3, 6, and 12 months post-adoption. After the first year, reports must be filed yearly until child turns 18.

Haiti: 7 post-adoption reports are typically required. The first 4 must be completed with the adoption service provider at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after adoption. The last 3 reports at moths 36, 48, and 60 may be submitted directly to IBESR by adoptive parents.

India: Post-adoption reports are required quarterly in the first year after adoption, and twice a year during the 2nd year. They may be submitted online by the adoption service provider.

Kazakhstan: Post-adoption reports are required every six months for the first 3 years, and once a year until the child is 18. Reports are to be submitted to Kazakhstani diplomatic mission in the country of the child’s residence.

Philippines: During the first 6 months of custody the adoption service provider must conduct bi-monthly reports. After this period, adoptive parents should file a petition for adoption in U.S. court.

Russia: Russia requires children to be registered with the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs before they leave Russia or with the Russian Embassy or Consulate upon arrive in the U.S. 4 post-adoption reports are required. The reports should be completed: (1) 5 months after adoption court order and submitted no later than the end of the 7th month, (2) 11 months after adoption court order and no later than then end of the 13th month, (3) 23 months after adoption court order and submitted no later than the end of the 25th month, and (4) 35 months after adoption court order and no later than then end of the 37th month.

Ukraine: Post-adoption reports are required annually for the first 3 years, and once every 3 years thereafter until the child is 18.


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Supporting and Preserving Adoptive Families: Profiles of Publicly Funded Post-Adoption Services

Source: www.adoptioninstitute.org

Supporting-Preserving-Adoptive-Families-page-0-copy-87x113 Supporting and Preserving Adoptive Families: Profiles of Publicly Funded Post-Adoption Services: This publication, funded by The Dave Thomas Foundation for Adoption, is part of the Institute’s national "Keeping the Promise" initiative. It provides the most extensive examination to date of what post-adoption services states are providing, who is eligible to receive them and how they are being funded.

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Post-Adoption Services: Acknowledging and Dealing with Loss by Nancy Randall, Psy.D. and Kim Shepardson Watson, LCSW

Source: http://www.adoptioncouncil.org

teen%20girl%20lonely%20forest%202016 “Some imagine that life for the newly adopted child will now unfold in typical “fairy tale” fashion, since the happy ending – a loving family – has been found. But what about the other side of adoption – the side that can often involve complicated feelings of loss and grief and, sometimes, lifelong unanswered questions? Losses are inherent in adoption….”

Read more.

Petition update – Governor Andrew Cuomo: NYS Should Fund Statewide Post Adoption Service

Aug 11, 2014 — After consultation with national adoption advocates and Senators that support the bill, Voice for Adoption is requesting individuals not call Senator Coburn’s office directly about this bill. There is concern that too many calls to Senator’s Coburn’s office may actually be counterproductive. Voice for Adoption and other adoption advocates will be working behind the scenes this August. If you want to visit with or call your Senator in their home office during the legislative summer break feel free to mention your support for HR 4980 but please do not mention Senator Coburn by name.

Click here to Read More & Promote this Petition

News From Armenia Regarding Post Adoption Reporting

clip_image002News From Armenia: Armenia has recently amended their adoption law, which included changes to the post adoption report requirements. The Ministry of Justice now requires post adoption reports for a period of five years after you arrive home with your child. The post adoption report schedule going forward will be the following:

#1: 3 months after arriving home

#2: 6 months after arriving home

#3: 12 months after arriving home

#4: 18 months after arriving home

#5: 2 years after arriving home

#6: 3 years after arriving home

#7: 4 years after arriving home

#8: 5 years after arriving home

If you believe this change may impact you, contact Michelle Moreau, MSW Post Placement Coordinator and Ghana Program Coordinator for Hopscotch Adoptions, Inc.

Alert: Russia Post-Placement Reports

russia%20post%20placement%20report%2006-26-2013 Russia requires post-placement reports to provide information regarding the welfare of children adopted by U.S. families.  Reports should be prepared in accordance with the requirements established by the Russian government and as agreed to during the adoption process.  All reports should be translated into Russian.  Reports may be submitted to the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation directly at the address included below or can be sent to the regional authorities where the adoption was completed.  More information regarding post-placement reports can be found on the Russia country information sheet.

Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation
Department of State Policy for the Protection of Children’s Rights
51 Lysinovskaya St.
Moscow, 117997

We strongly urge you to comply with the requirements established by the Russia government and complete all post-adoption requirements in a timely manner.  Your adoption agency may be able to help you with this process.

Source: http://adoption.state.gov

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