Adoption Notice: Obtaining Citizenship or Documenting Acquired Citizenship for Adopted Children – – March 2017

5b0a1571d451438a2a82a5dfc8dfd36d

March 15, 2017

The Office of Children’s Issues has received a high number of inquiries about whether individuals adopted through the intercountry process have acquired U.S. citizenship and how to go about documenting U.S. citizenship, if acquired. Claims to acquisition of citizenship cannot be pre-adjudicated, and the Office of Children’s Issues has no role in the adjudication process. Information is available on the Department of State and U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) web pages and may be helpful resources.

Continue reading.

Advertisements

How to Obtain a Social Security Card for Your Adopted Child

How to get a Social Security card and prove U.S. citizenship for a foreign-born adopted child

Social%20Security%20Card Parents of adopted children born outside the United States need Social Security numbers for their children. The law recently changed and these children "automatically" become U.S. citizens. But here’s the problem. The child does not have any proof of U.S. citizenship and Social Security requires proof of U.S. citizenship for the child. You only have immigration documents from the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). What do you do now?

Bring us the documents issued by DHS when the child arrived in the United States. We’ll assign a Social Security number, but the record will not show the child is a U.S. citizen. Later, when you get your child’s U.S. citizenship document, bring it to us and we’ll update your child’s record to show his or her U.S. citizenship. If your child already has a Social Security number, the number does not change when we update the record.

You can use your child’s birth certificate to prove his or her age, but you still need an identity document for the child. Social Security must always see the original document or a copy that is certified by the agency that issued the original document. Documents you can use when you apply for a card for an infant or young child include:

  • The adoption record
  • A United States DHS immigration document
  • Doctor, clinic or hospital records
  • Daycare center or school records
  • Religious record (e.g., baptismal record)

In addition, when you apply for a card for a child, we must also see proof of your identity and that you are the proper applicant.

The Child Citizenship Act of 2000, effective February 27, 2001 grants an adopted child, immigrating to the United States, "automatic" citizenship. The parent may apply for proof that the child is a U.S. citizen. If you want the Social Security record to show that your child is a U.S. citizen, apply for a Certificate of Citizenship from DHS or a U.S. passport from the Department of State for your child. We can use either document as proof of your child’s U.S. citizenship.

If you want to complete the application for a Social Security number before you visit a local office, go to Application for a Social Security Card.

Multiple Citizenship in Adoption: An Introduction by NCFA’s legal fellow Kaylee Walsh

Map%20travel%20airplane%20world Those working in adoption often face questions about dual or multiple citizenship from prospective adoptive parents and adopted adolescents and adults, who want to know how the internationally adopted person will attain U.S. citizenship, if they will have two passports, or if being a citizen of their birth country will affect their U.S. citizenship. This article by NCFA legal fellow Kaylee Walsh provides an introduction to these and other issues regarding multi-citizenship in intercountry adoption.

Click here to download the PDF of Adoption Advocate No. 94 or click here to view the web version.

%d bloggers like this: